About your Search

20121108
20121116
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43
, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> a look now at technology and entrepreneurship from a recent conference in detroit held at wayne state university. speakers include aol founder steve case, tim draper. former u.s. chief information officer. this is about two hours. >> thank you so much for getting us started. thank you all for being here. it's really exciting to finally have this thing and we. we've been working on for an awfully long time. what we do at techonomy is mostly up to now it's been sort of retreat like invitation only, leaders thing in the desert and i would really want to get our message out in the broader community, particularly in the united states where we think there's some messages that are just not sufficiently understood. and that's what you, i hope you will be hearing throughout the day today. and the message is, these events are focused on four issues. u.s. competitiveness, the future of jobs, economic growth, which is adequate to the first to come and then the revival of our cities with detroit as case study number one.
that there are cheaper technological solutions to our national security problem and the most obvious exponents of this is drones and other remote wrote -- invading a country, you can just the public perceives and many of thes received drone along its border. there's a fascinating strategic conversation about whether that is correct and will work out over time. there's also as anyone who has worked in this field knows, the fact that technology is rather expensive and that also justifies the need for an endless growing budget if your security is completely dependent on keeping your high tech offense ahead of both lower tech defense your adversaries will navigate against you. so technology is put forward and believed by the public to be a budget panacea but it is not. the third point that should be made about appetite is -- i would go further and say we saw in this election at the presidential level and the congressional level went across party lines and effort to make candidates pay for expressing willingness to cut pentagon spending and had zero effect and the massive infusion of corporate cont
president doesn't understand when you invest like that in one company makes a harder for technology generally because other entrepreneurs of the same field their opportunity to get capital. who wants to put money into a solar capital -- company when the government picked one of their choice? excellent question. i wrote the book we're spending about $12 billion per year to make electricity more expensive. that it is 6 billion of tax breaks and direct and chairs. this makes no sense in hers low income americans. we brainwashed children toothache greed it is good to think about green products and jobs that yet to we cannot define what a green job it is. that has five definitions of the green job as a discounted. energy from renewable sources. energy efficiency. energy pollution reduction in removal. natural resource conservation. environmental compliance education and training and public awareness. when i was testifying on capitol hill, they had a paper cup in front of me. most the time it it is just a bottle of water. it said architect of the capital and power to save energy on the ot
and involvement in the cyber war. technology drives everything we do. the internet has made is more connected than at any other time. the vast majority of our infrastructure reside in private sector. let me repeat that. the vast majority of our infrastructure reside in the private sector. the national security risks and the economic risks are still with the private sector. the government does not do it alone. they do it in concert with our partners and our partners are the private sector. for those of you were talking to earlier, with the work for the government or the private sector, you can contribute no matter where you are in whatever your professional desire is. this private-sector holds a lot of data and these are pretty profound -- their protection of the priorities is he has a list of priorities. this is the top five. the cyber threat is among the most serious challenges we face as a nation, and america's prosperity will depend on cyber security. the united states does have a huge challenge. we have a much larger body of sensitive and potentially damaging information to protect in most cou
a major, new bold investment program, going into a new market, expanding a new technology, ect., you are worried about what the tax rate will be when that's generates cash in nine years. the best thing to do is create a lower rate, an expectation that there's not giant tax increases later. >> i agree with that. i think we should do in, but, a, you know we have the highest statutory right and no higher than average effective rates because we have the narrowest base of owl corporate income in the world. >> yeah. >> one of the reasons we have that system is because people like us argued for many years that the more efficient thing, the more, the better way to encourage investment was not to cut the corporate rate, but to have massively accelerated depreciation, expansion of investment, focusing on incentives rather than cutting the rate overall. i think the intuition is changing, but the way we're going it cut the rate is not by closing loopholes, but come out a painful expansions of the base like getting rid of accelerated depreciation and things which have a value so i think -- >> is
technology for these people, especially the young people, who um, are trying to find a way to build a better life. and broadband can be an enabler there. so from a philanthropic perspective, we've also been trying to direct some of our efforts that way as well. but postally from a pricing -- mostly from a pricing perspective, we're trying to make it as affordable as possible for these people to get broadband. >> cost is one deterrent. is lack of a computer, digital literacy, what are some of the other issues -- >> guest: that's absolutely an issue. access to computers for, um, young people in the home is a real issue. in some homes in urban, poor areas, they don't have the digital literacy that you thought about, -- that you talk about, and that's a broader issue. we've been working more on a state-by-state basis within windstream. the usta has been very involved with that, carrying on dialogue with the fcc on how we might help there, but we've got a lot of work to do there. >> host: paul gardner -- or jeff gardner, when it comes to mobile broadband, is that included in the access america pl
, but fundamentally, it's an empowering technology for these people, especially the young people who are trying to find a way to build a life, and broadband is an enabler there. from a philanthropic perspective, we are directing efforts that way as well, but mostly, from a pricing perspective, we're trying to make it as affordable as possible for these people to get broadband. >> now, cost is one deterrent. is the lack of a computer, digital literacy, what are the other issues? >> guest: i think that's absolutely an issue. access to computers for young people in the home is a real issue. in some homes, in urban poor areas, they don't -- they don't have the digital literacy you talked about, and that's a broader issue. we've been working on more on a state-by-state basis within wind stream. the usta involved in that, carrying on dialogue with the fcc on how we help there, but there's a lot of work to do that. >> host: paul gardner -- or jeff gardner, when it comes to mobile broadband, is that included in the access america plan, the broadband plan? >> guest: it is. i mean they contemplate all ki
cain in ohio, and came within two points. the technology included the so-called system, which was the republican get out the vote technology to ensure we targeted people to get to the polls. that imploded. i'm told on election day, actually, so many hits from around the country as it should have saying, gee, this person voted, this person didn't, target calls, thought it was under attack, and closed down. for those of you here from, again, the technology field with the politics, we, republicans, want to talk to you. [laughter] we need help. the democrat system is calledded gordon, it was effective at microtargetting, and i heard a lot of antedotes, and you'll love somebody gets a call who is a democrat in law school, and it was gee, you know, we see that you have voted, this information is public available. we see you voted at two o'clock on election day, but your sister, at two lane, has not voted, could you call her? that's the level at which they were dealing, whereas, you know, we were flying blind at that point. part of it is technology, and part of a turnout that was imp
and technology section security and privacy in information law provision. closest to me we have jason chipman. he was the department of justice to deputy attorney general counsel. prior to that reserve and national security division at doj were his work focused on cyberoperations and national security council issues. i would like to start this discussion by asking elisabeth preston to come and give her remarks. thank you very much. >> good morning. my role will be to provide a little bit of context. i am going to talk a little bit about terminology to make sure that we are on the same page about the terminology and i will give you a bit of a chronology for the types of events that we have seen over the past 10, 12, 14 years -- something like that -- to give you some context. my colleagues, when we discuss the application of law and the sorts of context, we can work with any context we are using. this is a really interesting topic. it is not only topical, but it is on the minds of the most important government officials including at the highest level and so on. but what if you're just a few commen
honestly is the lack of an overall information technology architecture you and i have talked about this before, and it still doesn't exist today as far as i know. i've pointed that out and my committee has pointed that out and outside they've looked at the va's i.t. department and have pointed that out. i'm just not convinced that five years from now given that i don't know where you will be, but my fear is that we are going to be sitting here talking about the same issue again because we are not going about it with the discipline i come from an information technology career of over 30 years. i worked at u.s. special operations command as the director of the staff i know what it takes to get this stuff done, and five years, gentleman is totally unacceptable. and i don't really have a question for you. i just want you to fix this for crying out loud. >> can i respond? congressmen coming you and i but primarily roger baker and you have had this discussion. i work with you and we believe we have the good mark on architecture and i haven't satisfied you. we will come back and work on i
, the peaceful march across the world across the parched land and the dense rain forest of the congo. technology is transforming thicks. everything is speeding up. everything is opening up. now if i can talk about something i actually know about for a moment. this feeling reminds me a little bit maybe more than a little bit of the arrival of punk rod in the '70s. you see, the clash or the baffs of the rock and roll pyramid, and overnight gave the finger to the dreadful business, the top of the pyramid, it was called progressive rock. open sick songs. no good lyrics. [laughter] great reviews. [laughter] punk bands made no pretends of being better than the audience. they were the audience. if you. ed to play, grab a guitar. energy was in. the clash like a public service announcement with guitars. and they gave u12 2u2 that social act vifm could make as a musical rite. i like to point out that none of your professor, not a single one has ever drawn or likely to draw the connection between the arab spring and the clash. [laughter] [applause] just a little intermission. and okay. sharpen your pencils
of the information technology boom, creation of private credit and, therefore, rapid increase in tax revenues. and so what stephanie showed, this was something that was not forecast at the time. at the time those who were there in 2000 remember that the secretary of the treasury at the time was -- and the chairman of the federal reserve -- were talking about a 13-year horizon for the complete elimination of the public debt. and the congressional budget office was not forecasting that the information technology boom was an aberration that would come to an end, but it did. and from 2000 forward we were back into the much more normal position of the united states government running substantial budget deficits. and as the private sector rebuilt its financial position. so that's the first point is that long-term forecasts, the idea that one can control the future position of the debt and the deficit by actions taken today is an extremely tenuous and debatable idea. second point is that there are certain assumptions being made which create extremely ostensibly scary scenarios. those numbers that show and,
that is light years ahead in terms of technology in terms of the west and in many ways is a metaphor for the anti-colonialism, anti-imperialist metaphor for african nations in terms of what they can create outside of colonialism. so in my mind, this is an alternative space to see images of black folk that really you don't see anywhere else. nowhere else. i don't see this type of the lactic expression of blackness and maybe other than -- i mean there are not too many black space travelers. [laughter] so, sometimes i feel like a brother from another planet too but i digress. convention dictates the most awarding approach to understanding contemporary black racial formation in america or representation of the mass media found in examining the grand social and political dramas that have defined american racial issues over the past century. to name a few the great migration, jackie robinson, immigration of faith major baseball league post industrialism the groundbreaking success of the cosby show the ubiquitous presence of hip-hop in american culture in and of course the first black presi
defense technology. should we have discussion about this defense strategy? >> a couple thoughts. you say how do we invest domestic affairs, money we don't have. depending on the nature of the deal to raise revenue, basically you are saying money you are not spending will be available for the purpose of public investment depends on the larger parameters of the budget deal. as for waste in the pentagon mentioned whether my colleagues for a percentage on, it is the and pervasive and depends how you define it. if you are buying a weapon you down need, i would say yes. there are smaller waist in terms of procurement policy and so forth, but that is the key target. we could do a whole panel on an alternate strategy but it is clear that on nuclear weapons, preparing for counterinsurgency and the overly optimistic sense of what we can do with drones and naval power. of these are things to consider but we could have a whole conference on it. >> one barry specific way of thinking about waste is during this period of growth that the slide shows, there was astronomical growth in contracting and the
you're here. from the aba science and technology section, and a be a public law section. i'd like to get a special thanks to john harrington for pulling this together, to william black for is working this panel, and the aba international section for putting on this terrific program, a topic that i consider to be one of the biggest, scariest topics of our time. for those of you that are familiar with this topic, you may share some of my sentiments. i'm reluctant to say this on the public record, but quite frankly i'm terrified. and i trust at the end of this you will be as well. the first time that a realize that cyberwar and terrorism was a hot topic was when the national research council put out to scholarly publications on cyberwar, while at the same time "vanity fair" had cyberwar on the front page along with our best friends the british royals, kate and we'll. that tells you we're covering both ends of the spectrum. as we know, the director of national intelligence, mike mcconnell, famously said, we would lose a cyberwar if it took place. i think the canadians would win but i'
and more of them. we keep pulling the resources out. is where technology can be really an important and powerful vehicle. i think initially we had to vent -- said several minutes of these people and we have data at about 50,000. i think they've done a lot, put up huge effort trying to improve that. >> we are at a time in the administration, the second term of the administration were question of legacy often comes into play. people start talking about what will this administration be remembered for. so i kind of wonder what you, if you have the opportunity, which he did when you're were in office, at least two of the dead and maybe the others had the opportunity, if this president and the secretary of state, a 20 minute conversation about public diplomacy and what could be done that was particularly useful to leave something behind for years from now, what would be, what kind of things would you bring up? just to give you time to think about, let me remind, the bush administration under secretary glassman together with microsoft and a bunch of other people put together a conference o
for innovation driven development. scientific and technological innovation provide strategic support for raising productive forces and the overall national strength. we must give it top priority over national development. we should powerpad civic innovation to catch up with global advances. we should increase capacities for making original innovation integrated for making photo innovation on the basis of observing advances and oversee science and technology companies greater instances on making motivation for collaboration. should deeply or from the system for managing science and technology to speed up the development of the national innovation system, which is a system of innovation in which surprised us play a leading role in enterprises university in the research institutes were together. it's a knowledge-based innovation system of science and technology projects and implement strategy concerning intellectual property rights. third, carry a strategic adjustments that economic structure. this is a major goal of accelerating the change of the growth model. we must strive to remove major struct
was put in place in 1992. it was to be a temporary measure. it was going to boost the new technology. 20 years later, president obama's respected energy secretary says wind is a mature technology. and what have we got after 20 years and billions of dollars of subsidies? a puny amount of unreliable electricity. our country uses nearly 25% of all the electricity in the world. wind produces 3% of that. of course, it only produces it when the wind blows. it's not easy to store it. so it is of limited use in a country that needs huge amounts of low-cost, clean, reliable electricity. relying on wind power is the energy equivalent of going to war in sailboats when nuclear submarines are available. the wind subsidy is so large, mr. president, that wind developers are now paying distributors to take their wind power under cutting the base load energy plants that are necessary to provide the reliable electricity we need for the country. and on top of that, there are better ways to produce clean electricity, better ways than subsidizing a technology that destroys the environment in the name of savi
. you can actually use technology to make the class for more human. you mention the skepticism. i think there should be. we just ordered 500 ipads our school. integrate into curriculum or leverage it to make it transform what's going on. there usually are a lot of answers. it is good to be skeptical, but the same time there is reason for hope. >> how do you evaluate the impact? had a you know that they have actually worked? >> a lot of times, i meet people, i don't believe. these kind of girl bar hippie type people. and now i think i appreciate what they're saying. grades, you know, normally when you say people don't like greece to my being touchy-feely, not being rigorous, but actually, they're saying grades aren't rigorous enough. they give this feeling of rigor. when, somewhat arbitrary. depends on how it's measured. but even more than that, when you give grades, especially if you got a c on an exam, you have obvious weaknesses. and so that should be an assessment. you need to improve on those weaknesses. before we move on, it's common sense to me get your basics down. instead we use
a lot of people talk about the science technology. >> engineering. >> engineering and math. right. [laughter] i do think -- i am all for studying all these interesting things, but i do think that having those kinds of skills -- the countries we worry about competing with us a lot of their focus is on those things that actually have real world usefulness in the economy, and germany for a long time i spent a reasonable amount of time in germany they've emphasized engineering and technical backgrounds and certainly china is doing it and as i said i'm also with historians and even economists. [laughter] but i do think that having a strong base of people with those kind of skills would be a great thing. >> i think the most important point is education matters a lot. if you look at the unemployment break down in the u.s. right now it is skewed very much to words high school graduates are sort of a range of numbers but i think it's around 13, 14%. and as you get up past high school graduate, college graduate advanced degree it drops precipitously in the there is a gap we have right now i
of their semester papers. this undergirded american military strategy of using weapons and technology to thoroughly pummel the enemy before a single american soldier was sent into battle. the war also exposed the fact that japan, which adopted some of the capitalistic production methods seen in america come a lacked the essential pillars of exceptionalism to employ them fully in wartime. without free speech, free-market, free market, constitutional protection that allowed great businessman to try new ideas and fail without punishment, japan fell behind the u.s. almost instantly. in four years of war, the u.s. produced 17 fleet carriers. japan, one. we go into for example failures or at least not very successful and that would need andrew jackson higgins who produced an incredible number of craft, landing craft but after the war was -- out of business but especially if you look at people like howard hughes. howard hughes was a giant failure during world war ii. he doesn't produce any weapons that were. he produces the wooden recognizance airplane very fast but they aren't really use before the end o
, the king of the nation called wauconda is light-years ahead in terms of technology in terms of the west indies in many many ways the metaphor for the anti-colonial, anti-imperialist metaphor for african nation in terms of what they can create outside of colonialism. so in my mind, this is an alternative space to see images of black folk that really you don't see anywhere else. nowhere else. i don't see this type of galactic expression of likeness. i mean, there's not too many black space travelers. so sometimes i feel at the rather from another planet, too. but i digress. convention dictates the most rewarding approach to black racial formation and i'll try to go gracefully from here. the most rewarding approach to understanding contemporary black racial formation in america are black representation mass media sound in examining the grand social and political dramas that have defined american racial nations. to name a few, the great migration, jackie robinson and immigration at the major league is slowly come around to defend the civil rights movement, postindustrial movement, the cosby
to double the we learn for the rest of our lives and you are seeing this play out in the technology age we're in with the explosion of online courses. people are hungry to learn. people are hungry to improve their knowledge and not just for getting ahead careerwise but to understand the things so many of us feel we missed out in high school because maybe they didn't spend enough time on it or they have a lousy teacher. i speak to a great many really dedicated teachers especially in the social studies area. i am not dumping on teachers. i believe we ask them to delay next to impossible job and don't give them a very good tools to do it but on the other hand i have heard from too many people who got turned off by that one bad teacher whether it is history or biology or any subject and now they are rediscovering it. that is one of the real audiences i have always tried to speak to. people who feel we are in a constant process of learning, lifelong learning and learning should go on forever. >> host: using don't know much about the civil war as a guide how do you organize your books? >> guest:
mccain in ohio and still came within two points. the technology included so-called orca system. some of you maybe read about that in the last couple days which was the republican get-out-the-vote technology to insure that we were targeting people getting to the polls. it imploded on election day. it got so many hits from around the country as it should have saying gee this person voted. this person didn't vote. target calls. we thought it was under attack and closed down. so for those of you here from, again, the technology field and with interest in politics, we republicans want to talk to you. [laughter] we need some help. the democrats system i think is called gorton was quite effective at microtargeting. i heard a lot of anecdotes. i heard one this morning that you will love. someone gets a call a democrat in law school. gee, we see you voted. by the way this information is publicly voted. it is at 2:00 on election, but your sister at tulane has not voted, could you call her? that east the level which they were dealing we frankly were flying blind at that point. part of it is tec
getting a transportation bill. it's a combination of things. modern technology, frankly it is a 24/7 news media. it is the fact that the members leave their families back home. you can't be a good legislator two and half days a week. you have to work at it. the combination of those things, it contributed to the partisanship and the gridlock that we have now. the answer is simple. it is called leadership. men and women of goodwill, conservative liberals, republicans, and the president -- they say it is an easy and we have to get results. >> so i want to come back to that. let's talk about the challenges that lay ahead over the next three to six months in the government. you have divided power, fiscal problems that you have to address. it's not unlike 1990. you are able to put together a pretty good package in 1990 that led to pave the way for it the deficit subsequently. something like that happen now? what was so different about 1990 than what we have now? >> well, i think it would be more difficult to do it. i came to the senate in january of 1977. when i came there, you had democrats an
and drugs and it has become so problematic that big pharma and medical technology developers are now going to other countries to do clinical trials and the work that is necessary to prove there are drugs and devices that work successfully in humans. this is a very backward way of promoting national security in the context of preventing people from disease and injury through advanced technology but it is important that our industry in the health sector is turning to other countries, that we maintain strong relations with those countries and make sure there is a handshake between our medical professionals and their medical professionals, the we are not just experimenting on their population. that is important unintended consequence of the current policy. >> if i could pile on the your question, i see a connection between bill held, poor health, economic activity, lack of, leading to and related to lack of education, and local in security that invites inattention, lack of governance, and as we have seen in recent decades, places where insecurity and instability are havens for troublemakers an
nerd. he liked the technological toys of the west. he was in touch with the syrian population. he certainly was not a lackey of the united states, and israel. in fact he was supported of hezbollah, amass, iran, and other groups and states, that had a lot of street credibility in the arab world. so they thought it would pass them over. in fact i know that president bashar had mentioned -- commissioned three studies in february and march before the uprising broke out, and all three said, no, it's not going to happen in syria. so he felt pretty confident. i know for -- i can guarantee you that he was absolutely shocked when the uprising really started to seep into syria, particularly, of course, what lit the fire was the arrest and roughing up of the 15 school age children, teenagers, in the southern city of duras in syria. that touched a nerve. that sort of thing happened in syria quite a bit over the years, but in the new circumstances of the arab spring, and the regime didn't under the new circumstances -- it just grew and grew and grew after that. and it unleashed -- i think this
technology? [laughter] >> let's take three more questions. the three people who are in line. >> mr. wolfe, um, i'm a native miamian, and thanks to you about 20 years ago there were three gentlemen running across i-95, um, asking if they could help my husband and i. and i knew what was going down having read "bonfire of the vanities." they weren't coming to help me at all. [laughter] and we were robbed at gunpoint. but i've since lived here for a long time and raised three children, and it's a wonderful city. i love miami, and i just wondered after you having done your research and meeting all these interesting characters that we clearly have no shortage of here, if it's the kind of place that you think you could live. >> well, i think there's no blanket statement that i think i could make because there's such variety in miami. i don't know these statistics for single mothers and things like that, you probably do, but it's, it's such a complicated, it's really such a complicated subject. but it wouldn't hurt people to cut down a little bit, seems to me. >> do you think you could live here? do
that owned millvinia but there would be no way to know for sure. 20 first century technology is what helped unravel -- ten years ago i wouldn't have been able to write this book in the way that it is now. >> any more questions? we have a little time left. i just wanted to say something about the book that made me think, but here in texas, looking at its history, particularly the history of slavery and how texas developed, i didn't know but someone shared with me that there was an incentive to have slaves here in texas among regular people because as the land was given away the mexican government giving of land away was based on how many people were in your group. if you could bring slaves, then you would get more land, regular people brought slaves, especially in texas, lots of working-class people came with slaves in order to enhance, are an interesting test about texas itself. regular people and slavery. we have a little more time. if anyone would like to ask a question. okay. would you please move to the mike. >> when i looked at the first lady's great granddad in the new york times and
. this undergirded american military strategy of using weapons and technology to thoroughly pummeled the enemy before an american soldier was sent into battle. the were also exposed the package of japan, which adopted some of the capitalistic reduction methods seen in america, lacked the essential pillars of exceptionalism to employ them fully and more time. without free speech, free market, constitutional protection of the great inventors and businessmen to try new ideas and feel without punishment japan fell behind the u.s. almost instantly. and for your support, the u.s. produced 15 fleet carriers. japan won. we go into, for example, two guys viewed as failures or at least not very successful guys and that would be andrew jackson higgins who produced an incredible number of craft, a landing craft after the war was harassed them out of business. especially look at people like howard hughes. howard hughes views this giant failure during world war ii because he doesn't produce any weapons that work. he produces what reconnaissance airplanes. since the whole point. people like howard hughes were neces
within two points. the technology included the so-called orca system. many of you have read about that in the last couple of days, which was the republican get out the vote technology to ensure that we were targeting people getting to the polls. i'm told on election day actually got so many hits around the country as it should have from people saying this person voted this person didn't vote, they thought it was under attack and close down. so for those of you here from again detect elegies field and with interest in politics, we republicans want to talk to you. we need some help. the democratic system i think is called gordon was actually quite effective at mike retargeting. i heard one this morning it was. somebody get the call who is a democrat, who is in law school and police chief, we see you have voted. the information is publicly available. it's at 2:00 on election day, but your sister at tulane has not voted. could you call her? that is the level at which they were dealing, whereas we frankly were flying blind at that point. part of it is to elegy and not lead to a turnout
california is so much less technologically advanced but there we are so all these figures are necessarily a little incomplete as they apply to the nation and there's other states with votes still out, too. it appears that obama will get a huge electoral advantage out of this relatively narrow popular vote margin. assuming that he carries florida where he is in the current towns ahead in the miami-dade county people are this year counting votes without the assistance of many republican and democratic lawyers. the electoral vote is 332 to 206. that was a margin in 2004 and only got 286 votes. obama was slightly less. it appears it gets 3:32. i think that there is a certain structural demographic advantage over democrats in the electoral college in this era. the democratic voters tend to be clustered in some big large metropolitan areas, and in particular neighborhoods and they give the democrats and initially advantage within the electoral college. president obama of 57% or more of the popular vote in 11 states and the district of columbia and the have 163 electoral votes. romney 113 states
, whether that was registration forms or getting people their checklist or whatever technology they were using, that made him a difference because they could talk to more people. these are hundreds of thousands of door knobs and phone calls they were able to do. so that's a big thing. then when you look at the exit polls, there's a couple things beyond the changing face of the nation, a changing attitude of the nation. when you think about what happened on election night, wisconsin elected the nation's first open lesbian senator to gay marriage approved in four states. marijuana would be legal in colorado. this is a country where people are becoming more socially liberal, while the republicans are doing this soul-searching between what type of social policies they want to promote. that trip to a lot of senate candidates. we will talk more about that i'm sure. and so this is where young voters are a big part of this demographic key as well. they actually turned out in bigger numbers in 2012 than he did in 2008 despite her not being an overall. the democrats talked a lot in 2008 about want
technology or delivery system reform or something solves the problem, which is quite conceivable, is it really urgent that we try to settle this problem to the extent that it's a problem between now and the holidays or in the spring of 2013? again, i think the rational person would ask, you know, this is kind of like saying, well, you know, your parents had cancer when they were 60, so at the age of 20 you should go ahead and have an operation just in case, right? just to make sure. it might develop in 30 or 40 years. well, then why is it -- and this is, ultimately, a political question. it's not an economic question. why is anyone talking about fixing social security and medicare in the next six months? or the next, for that matter, five or six weeks? as part of a grand bargain? why are you even discussing this? and even if there were a few irrational people saying things, why would anyone take it seriously? i think this shows the answer. this is one of the ways that you can cut social security benefits that have been discussed as a possible part of the grand bargain. monique me
they be studying? >> um, i think a lot of people talk about what they call s.t.e.m., science, technology, something and math. >> engineering. >> engineering and math, right. [laughter] you know, i do think, look, i'm all for -- you know, i have a son who's majoring in classics. i'm all for studying all these interesting things. but i do think that having those kinds of skills are what -- it's part of when you do look at the countries that we worry about competing with us, a lot of their focus is on studying those kinds of things that actually have, you know, have real world usefulness in the economy. and germany for a long time, i've spent a reasonable amount of time in germany, has emphasized engineering and technical backgrounds, and certainly china is going it, and i'm all for -- as i said, i'm all for having historians and even economists. [laughter] economists are very important. but, or money managers. but i do think that having those kinds of, having a strong base of people with those kinds of skills is a great, would be a great thing. >> so i think that the most important point is education
heroic world saving effort to mobilize technology, radar, proximity, and all number of invention synthetic rubber and atomic bomb we need to bring that same miracle of progress as an organized on -- concerted effort to the civil began front including medical care and that document that became -- agenda document for the whole post war effort. completely bipartisan, truman, eisenhower and the kennedy space mission to put the curve bending from science front and center in the national policy. it's been unfortunate the scientific emphasis has fallen off the national agenda over the last few years. i think we paid a price for it not only in terms of our own health but also in terms of the future cost of the medical programs and health care programs. now i'm optimistic that o'you can find a way to get it back on the agenda, in this second term. for example, to president obama science adviser if you look at the on document that doesn't seem to get any attention. if it got published from the executive office of the president on september 25th there's a call for the doubling of the new me
and that helped. it's the spirit and technology of the internet. >> and i suppose everybody saw this going on amazon.com and look at every binders in the thousands and thousands of comments. this finder just doesn't hope my comments. >> priority for standardized effect is. there are no women in it. >> was speaking associate media, one of the questions is prompted by treat from election evening. when we realize we had part of the historic results of this last week where he had 20 women in the u.s. senate, and historic number and rebecca rightly reminded us that it was in part because of things like emily's list that i want to have a conversation about the kind of institutions and the organizations that have been working quiet they all this time to make this moment possible. i don't have to say something about emily's list. >> families list within washington politics, it is an incredibly powerful force. at some point they were the largest organization. i don't know if that's still true, in the day of the super pacs, they are not the largest anybody. so emily's list is an organization that su
to the poll. mitt romney got fewer than john mccain and still came within two points. the technology included the so-called system some of you have maybe read about in the last couple of days which was the republican get-out-the-vote technology to ensure people are getting to the polls. i'm told on election day it had so many hits around the country as it should have from people saying this person voted and this person didn't. but if that was under attack it closed down. so for those of you hear from again that technology field to enter some politics, we republicans want to talk to you. [laughter] we need some help. the democratic system was quite effective at micro targeting and i've heard lots of anecdotes and one this morning that you will love that somebody gets a call that's a democrat from law school and was we see that you voted and disinformation is publicly available. was it you that voted 2:00 on election day but your sister hasn't. can you call her. that's the level at that point. that led to a turnout effort that in the end makes the difference. the increase in turnout among the b
interesting time. [applause] >> how could i not like technology? i am a fat guy who prefers elevators and escalators. i feel hot air for a living and i fly way too much for the engines and despite the helicopters sunday. if i look like you know what, then you're right. your eyes are not deceiving you. i got about two and half hours of sleep and cut this 7:00 train down to new york was jennifer duffy is able to watch the senate and house editors on the decision desk at nbc, which is a fascinating place was about 50 people in the room and about two thirds of them are statisticians and look like eight models on each race. so in other words, each of the 50 states presidential, each senate race in each governor's race looking at lake nasser meets politics. and were sort of the nonquantitative people that because we watched the race year in and year out is sort of the hey, does this make sense type thing. so for someone his s.a.t. score was significantly lower than my verbal, it's really cool for me to be in the room. but anyway, it's a lot of fun and we were very pleased and had a really g
what california is so much less technologically advanced. but there we are. for all these figures are necessarily a little incomplete as they apply to the nation. there's some other states with votes still out, too. it appears that obama will get a huge electoral vote advantage out of this relatively narrow popular vote margin. assuming he carries florida what he is in current counts ahead in the miami-dade county, people are this year counting votes without the assistance of many republican and democratic lawyers. with florida commit electoral vote, 332-206. bush was a 51-40 margin in 2004 only got 286 votes. obama was slightly less it appeared, gets 332. i think there's a certain structural demographic advantage for democrats in the electoral college in this era. democratic voters tend to be clustered in something large metropolitan areas, and in particular neighborhoods, and to give the democrats an initial advantage in the electoral college. president obama got 57% or more of the popular vote in 11 states and the district of columbia, and they have 163 electoral votes. romney
understand it's a realist, that there are problems. this is why i fought to bring in new technology. this is why i fought to, you know, bring the uab. this is why i fought to bring in the excess equipment from iraq and afghanistan after coming barks, and we're doing all of this, but we have to work together. >> i appreciate your efforts there, but i would suggest to you that the people that are pulling the strings, the president of the united states, it is being undermine to allow those new resources to happen and to get what we need when we give last year, you had a press release saying the u.s. has not seen spillover violence. saying the u.s. has not received violence when we're acknowledging there's deaths, the law enforcement was engaged in give up battles, people killed, tons of narcotics, and that's not the mention the ones we can't talk. that's what is impeding this. recognize what it is the drug cartel members, we can't pursue them across the border, and we need a message we're going to put whatever it takes to defend the sovereignty of our country. >> he made the point that
the staffing and the technology and equipment, but it's also the policies dealing also with immigration. i've said that there's a full immigration reform bill, then we can let the people coming into work, that come in, where it's ag, whatever the other area might be. we have to do that. then we can focus resources on bad people, trying to come in to hurt us in one way or the other with drugs, smuggling, trafficking, whatever the case might be. we have to look at that approach. >> unless you hire people without proper documentation, what do you think? >> thank you for your service to the country and preacing the country. on the issue of illegal purchase, i wish hollywood wouldn't glamourize it the way they do. on the failed immigration system, it is a contributor. i've been overhead, overnight, texas dps community kateing with border patrol on the ground, and they don't know if it's an ak-47 or somebody looking for one, and our country has relied on guest labor for 60-plus years, and we have to solve the problem, and you are seeing more proposals. the a.q. commissioner -- ag commissioners a
always recognized the critical role technology plays in these rescue efforts. from the amber alert to his spearheading the launch of the national center's cyber tip line in 1998, this so-called 9/11 for the internet is a clearing center for reports of crimes against children on the internet and so far has received more than 1.5 million reports. ernie is a lawyer and a member of the kentucky bar. he is also a teacher, having held faculty positions at the university of louisville, the university of kentucky, and indiana university. he's been honored by his alma matter,the university of louisville as a distinguished alumnus of the louis brandeis school of law and is an outstanding alumnus of the cheng of arts and sciences. i'm pleased to report to my colleagues that ernie will not be leaving the fight for america's kids. no, his passion won't allow him to take a typical retirement. we're lucky that even as he's stepping down from his role at the helm of the center for missing and exploited children, he is a he focused exclusively on his new role as president and c.e.o. of the international c
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)